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Monday, July 6, 2020 | History

2 edition of On utilitarianism and horizontal equity as welfare-symmetry in incomes found in the catalog.

On utilitarianism and horizontal equity as welfare-symmetry in incomes

Jesus Seade

On utilitarianism and horizontal equity as welfare-symmetry in incomes

by Jesus Seade

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Published by Universityof Warwick, Dept. of Economics in Coventry .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Statementby Jesus Seade.
SeriesWarwick economic research papers -- no.197
ContributionsUniversity of Warwick. Department of Economics.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL14866601M

grounding utilitarian in a sophisticated (if controversial) meta-ethical theory, he defended it as a reasonable way of solving a variety of moral problems. Finally, in the late twentieth century and the early twenty-first century, Peter Singer has also applied utilitarianism to a variety of moral problems. In addition to publishing books andFile Size: KB. Economics terms. definitions from Chapt 20, 23, and 24 in Principles of Economics by Greg Mankiw 6th edition book total taxes paid divided by total income. total taxes/total income ex: Gov't taxes 20% for the first $50k income, 50% for all income over $50k. Your income is $60k a year. vertical equity and horizontal equity.

In a capitalist economy, taxes are the most important instrument by which the political system puts into practice a conception of economic and distributive justice. Taxes arouse strong passions, fueled not only by conflicts of economic self-interest, but by conflicting ideas of fairness. Taking as a guiding principle the conventional nature of private property, Murphy and Nagel show how taxes. This essay, then, will present and consider various arguments in support of utilitarianism. Also, since much of the opposition to utilitarianism issues from misunderstandings of the theory, Mill says he will also focus on what utilitarianism actually posits. Commentary. In these introductory remarks, Mill sets the stage for his essay.

Identify the statement that is consistent with utilitarian ethical theory? a. The end may justify the means b. There is no consensus among utilitarians on how to measure and determine the overall good c. It is difficult to know how to consider the consequences for all the parties that will be affected by an act d. Equity: For many, the goal of equity not only means a fair and equal distribution of income and wealth, but also generating the greatest good for the greatest number. Implicit in the redistribution of income and wealth is the utilitarianism notion that every individual's utility contributes equally to society's welfare.


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On utilitarianism and horizontal equity as welfare-symmetry in incomes by Jesus Seade Download PDF EPUB FB2

NBER Working Paper No. (Also Reprint No. r) Issued in June NBER Program(s):Public Economics. This paper establishes that, far from being able to derive the principle of horizontal equity from utilitarianism, the principle is actually in- consistent with utilitarianism in.

Utilitarianism (the dominant faith of ‘old’ welfare economics), is too concerned with the welfare sum to be concerned with the problem of distribution and can produce strongly anti‐egalitarian results. Hence, the use of welfare economics for measuring inequality is rejected.

Downloadable (with restrictions). This paper establishes that, far from being able to derive the principle of horizontal equity from utilitarianism, the principle is actually in- consistent with utilitarianism in a variety of circumstances.

We derive conditions under which (a) it is optimal to impose random tax schedules (ex post randomization) ; and (b) it is optimal to randomize the tax. The implications for optimal tax theory are discussed. More generally, it is shown that there are a number of potentially important economic situations with which the principle of horizontal equity may be inconsistent not only with utilitarianism but even with Pareto optimality.

This paper investigates the relationship between utilitarianism and horizontal equity in models of income taxation in particular and self-selection in general. An example involving well-behaved individual preferences is constructed in which a maximization of a utilitarian social welfare function leads via income taxation to horizontal by: Stiglitz, J.,Utilitarianism and horizontal equity: The case for random taxation, Journal of Public Econom In particular, one cannot expect to deduce from the structure of the income tax law the concept of justice in tax by: Household needs must be taken into account when designing an equitable income tax.

In this article, the authors are concerned with the use of equivalence scales to achieve horizontal equity. Optimal Utilitarian Taxation and Horizontal Equity Article in Journal of Public Economic Theory 7(4) February with 31 Reads How we measure 'reads'.

Abstract. In this chapter, we examine in more detail a more neglected aspect of the notion of redistributive justice: horizontal equity (HE) in taxation (including negative taxation).

1 Two main approaches to the measurement of TIE are found in the literature, which has evolved substantially in the last thirty classical formulation of the HE principle prescribes the equal treatment.

Concentration curve Discrimination Equality of opportunity Equality of resources Hobbes, T. Horizontal equity Liability progression Locke, J. Lorenz curve Nozick, R. Positioning Procedural equity Progressive and regressive taxation Rawls, J.

Redistribution of income Relative deprivation Residual progression Sen, A. Social justice Utilitarianism. For example, income tax helps improve vertical equity by taxing according to how much people earn. High-income earners may a higher proportion of their income in tax.

(See: progressive tax) Horizontal equity is an important starting point for any tax system. Horizontal equity can be consistent with also achieving vertical equity. Horizontal equity Horizontal equity is based on the idea that those who have the same amount of wealth, or similar levels of income, should be taxed at the same rate as others within that same.

income tax reforms. While most of the existing criteria, framed in the utilitarian tradition, are uniquely based on information about individual incomes, this paper, building upon the opportunity egalitarian theory, proposes new equity criteria which take into account Cited by: 1.

Utilitarianism and Equality by Benjamin Studebaker One of the key topics in moral philosophy is utilitarian ethics–the notion that some principle or concept, usually happiness or pleasure or some variant, should be maximised across society. Abstract. We impose a horizontal equity restriction on the problem of finding the optimal utilitarian tax mix.

The horizontal equity constraint requires that individuals with the same ability have to pay the same amount of taxes regardless of their preferences for : Henrik Jordahl and Luca Micheletto.

For a classic work on utilitarianism, see John Stuart Mill, Utilitarianism, ed. George Sher (Indianapolis: Hackett Publishing Company, []).For an accessible introduction, see Russ Shafer-Landau, The Fundamentals of Ethics (New York: Oxford University Press, ), chaps.

9 and Utilitarians disagree here—some think that there are a variety of intrinsically good things that we. Essentially, the ability to pay approach to fairness in taxation requires that burden of tax falling on the various persons should be the same.

In the discussion of various characteristics of a good tax system, we mentioned about the two concepts of equity, namely horizontal equity and vertical equity based on the principle of ability to pay. NBER Program(s):Public Economics. Anti-utilitarian norms often are used in assessing tax systems.

Two motivations support this practice. First, many believe utilitarianism to be insufficiently egalitarian. Second, utilitarianism does not give independent weight to other equitable principles, notably concerns that reforms may violate horizontal equity or result in rank reversals in the income distribution.

income taxation and its policy implications, each from somewhat different perspectives. Kaplow () offers a book -length argument that the ideas discussed here represent the unifying conceptual framework for thinking about all normative questions in economics.

Boadway () offers a discussion and critique of Kaplow. Executive SummarySwitching from joint to independent taxation of spouses in married couples would reduce marginal tax rates on secondary earners, make the tax system marriage neutral, and facilitate return-free filing through exact withholding.

This switch would, however, abandon the perspective that total household income is the best measure of ability to : Jeffrey B Liebman, Daniel Ramsey. Equity and Equality* Is horizontal equity (HE) the "most widely accepted principle of equity"? Or does it stand in "opposition to the advancement of human welfare"?

This paper argues that the case for the HE principle is not as straightforward as is usually thought and that it. Utilitarianism is one of the most important and influential moral theories of modern times. In many respects, it is the outlook of Scottish philosopher David Hume () and his writings from the midth century.

But it received both its name and its clearest statement in the writings of English philosophers Jeremy Bentham () and John Stuart Mill ().Author: Emrys Westacott.A Fundamental Objection to Tax Equity Norms: A Call for Utilitarianism, National Tax Journal, vol.

48, (). A Note on Horizontal Equity, Florida Tax Review, vol. 1, (). Horizontal Equity: Measures in Search of a Principle, National Tax Journal, vol. 42, ().